Dear Congressman Abbitt

“Dear Congressman Abbitt”

Virginians and National Politics, 1948-1973

[Letter] 1968 July 30, Washington, D.C. [to] Martha H. Richardson, Lynchburg, Va.

Title

[Letter] 1968 July 30, Washington, D.C. [to] Martha H. Richardson, Lynchburg, Va.

Description

In seven-page handwritten letter, Martha Richardson of Lynchburg, Virginia complained to Abbitt about street crime, "negro hoodlum[s], arsonists, murder, [and] rapists," Stokeley Carmichael, "the misuse of poverty funds all over the country," the abolishment of corporal punishment, the prohibition of prayer in schools, the nomination of Abe Fortas to the Supreme Court, unions, and the American Civil Liberties Union. In the letter, Richardson explained what she saw as two views of freedom in U.S. society: freedom as “the right to demonstrate, roam the streets, destroying and burning, murdering and costing the country millions of dollars" to " the right to go and come from their work or homes in safety and protected." Enclosing a newspaper clipping criticizing Stokeley Carmichael with her letter, Richardson concluded that "the negroes are and always will be un-civilized Africans—they will never be able to mix, as other minority groups have, with this culture.”

Creator

Richardson, Martha H.

Date

1968-07-30

Relation

Congressman Watkins Moorman Abbitt Papers.

Type

Text.

Spatial Coverage

Lynchburg, Virginia

Files

Citation

Richardson, Martha H. , “[Letter] 1968 July 30, Washington, D.C. [to] Martha H. Richardson, Lynchburg, Va.,” Dear Congressman Abbitt, accessed November 23, 2017, http://abbitt.richmond.edu/items/show/377.

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