Dear Congressman Abbitt

“Dear Congressman Abbitt”

Virginians and National Politics, 1948-1973

Browse Items (28 total)

An issue of Common Sense, self-proclaimed as "The Nation's Anti-Communist Newspaper", with a focus on the relationship between communism and "race-mixing".

Frank S. Littlejohn, a physician from Marhsall, Texas, wrote to thank Abbitt for his stand in support of segregation, which believe to be “aside from the Bricker Amendment” the most important issue facing the nation. Littlejohn commented: “The…

Arkansas Faith, a segregationist magazine, focused on resistance to desegregation in general and the Supreme Court's Brown v. Board decision. This issue of the magazine included articles on "race mixing" between African American soldiers and white…

B.L. McCullough of Seattle, Washington wrote to Abbitt to decry the Supreme COurt's ruling in Brown v. Board and Decried the Brown v. Board decision and other “Negroid decisions which no Southern State has the slightest intention of obeying." He…

In a speech marked as to delivered in Farmville, Virginia, Abbitt denounced civil rights legislation advanced in Congress and supported by the Kennedy administration. Abbitt made the case that this legislation "perverted" the constitution and…

Frequent correspondent, J.R. Orgain, Jr., wrote to Abbitt informing him that Reverend G.W. Walker of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, African American publisher of National Christian Magazine, was “willing to go any place called to neutralize the…

L. E. Pettyjohn of Suffolk, Virginia, wrote Abbitt to say he and others in Suffolk were "100%" behind Abbitt's opposition to civil rights legislation under debate in Congress. He also requested that Abbitt send him a report on the scrape slaughter…

C.R. Dunn of Baskerville, Virginia, wrote to Abbitt to praise his opposition to Kennedy's civil rights legislation and his recent speech on the House floor on the topic. The letter, addressed "Dear Watt," also included a postscript on the need to…

In this address to the Lions Club of Statesville, North Carolina, the Reverend James P. Dees began by describing his compassion for African Americans, but also declared his staunch opposition to integration. He also discussed his objections to…

In this pamphlet, the Citizens Grass Roots Crusade of South Carolina argued that civil rights efforts by Africans Americans were a communist plot to undermine the United states. The pamphlet contented that African Americans had been duped by the…
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