Dear Congressman Abbitt

“Dear Congressman Abbitt”

Virginians and National Politics, 1948-1973

Browse Items (14 total)

Fred W. Matthis of Pamplin, Virginia wrote to Abbitt following passage of the "anti-riot" bill that Abbitt had sponsored, praising the bill and sharply criticizing the Supreme Court, Martin Luther King, Stokeley Carmichael, and Lyndon Johnson. In his…

A telegram from a constituent with a response from Abbitt in which the congressman said that he believed that national leaders and the Supreme Court had begun advocating for strict gun control in order to trick the American people into believing that…

Correspondence between Abbitt and Howard Clark, secretary of the Powhatan Rifle & Pistol Club, Inc. in which both parties expressed their concern over the issue of gun control. Abbitt in his letter said that he would not feel safe at home without…

Letter to Abbitt from a constituent fearing gun control legislation during a time of rioting following the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. Chiles wrote, "I'm sick at heart at the riots, raping, looting, burning, sniping, and so on. I do not…

In prepared remarks for the House floor Abbitt declared his opposition of the desegreagtion of the University of Mississippi in October of 1962, Abbitt is opposed to the portrayal of the media towards white protestors. In late September, 1962 African…

A letter sent to President Lyndon B. Johnson, Senator Harry F. Byrd, and Abbitt following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. which talks of rioting and the loss of law and order. The author wrote that "the Nation stands on the brink of…

This is a receipt, dated March 26, 1968, for the purchase of 3 tear gas guns and shells from the United Safety Supply Co., totaling $31.44. Abbitt's initials can be seen in the top corner.

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In this press release, Abbitt highlighted his remarks on the floor of House of Representatives critiquing riots in the wake of the April 4th assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Describing civil unrest as an “armed insurrection,” Abbitt…

J.P. Lewis of Suffolk, Virginia, sent Abbitt both a letter and a follow-up telegram demanding that Congress investigate the NAACP and CORE as vigorously as it had the KKK. Lewis also shared his views that there was now "to [sic] much law for the…

In a draft of speech, Abbitt denounced H.R. 2516 as a “bad law” and a “so-called civil rights bill.” Calling civil rights, “a fuzzy term now used to cover any privilege demanded by loud and militant minorities,” Abbitt pointed out what…
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