Dear Congressman Abbitt

“Dear Congressman Abbitt”

Virginians and National Politics, 1948-1973

Browse Items (7 total)

Jack Rathborne of Arlington, Virginia, wrote to Byrd to call his attention to a “venomous” speech by NAACP member Agnes Meyer before the 1957 banquet of the Arlington Education Association. Rathborne asked that Byrd public refute what he…

Isham T. Wilkinson of Kenbridge, Virginia, wrote to Senator Harry Byrd protesting the integration of public schools, criticizing the NAACP, and avowing that the Supreme Court had violated States rights. He wrote the letter on stationary with the…

Letter to Harry Byrd explaining the Philippine tobacco situation; Abbitt outlined the situation as a whole, and gave his opinion of what should be done, namely, that Philippine sugar growers should not be given additional quotas for their product as…

This letter, sent by William Rawlings, Executive-Secretary of the Association of Virginia Peanut and Hog Growers, as well as a Virginian State Senator, is a friendly correspondence with Abbitt concerning the peanut industry. The two had a…

Letter from Abbitt to Senator Byrd informing him that the bill that separated Virginian Type 21 dark-fired tobacco from Type 22, 23 and 24 Tennessee-Kentucky tobacco was on its way to be made law. Abbitt suggested a strategy on how to get this bill…

Letter from Isham T. Wilkinson, a frequent correspondent of Abbitt, to Senator Harry Flood Byrd regarding Governor Lindsay Almond's school closing plan and Wilkinson's disapproval of Abbitt's approach to massive resistance. In the letter, Wilkinson…

In a letter sent to each member of Virginia's congressional delegation, the Richmond Branch of the NAACP urged Abbitt to support H.R. 3147, an anti-lynching bill. Two weeks earlier, on April 24, 1959, Mack Parker, an African American, was lynched…
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