Dear Congressman Abbitt

“Dear Congressman Abbitt”

Virginians and National Politics, 1948-1973

Browse Items (10 total)

In a speech marked as to delivered in Farmville, Virginia, Abbitt denounced civil rights legislation advanced in Congress and supported by the Kennedy administration. Abbitt made the case that this legislation "perverted" the constitution and…

Letter to Abbitt regarding fair housing and the Civil Rights Act of 1968, which Abbitt referred to as "the so-called Civil Rights Bill." Abbitt promised to his constituent that he would vocally oppose the legislation.

This bill, introduced by Abbitt in the House of Representatives, proposed to prohibit the Supreme Court from invalidating a state statute on grounds of constitutionality, except by unanimous decision.

A letter to Abbitt from a constituent who opposed Eisenhower's policies and character--especially regarding integration and civil rights legislation. The letter ends with a grateful message on states' rights and the loyalty of Southern politicians to…

This pamphlet, published by the Duval County Federation for Constitutional Government of Jacksonville, Florida, accused the NAACP, Americans for Democratic Action, World federalists, and other "leftist organizations” of carrying out “an organized…

A high school senior from Chester, Virginia, preparing for a a school debate, wrote to Abbitt requesting information on Hawaiian statehood. Abbitt replied that he was against Hawaii becoming a state.

Resolution adopted by the Sons of Confederate Veterans, A.P. Hill camp, objecting to statement of. Father Theodore M. Hesburgh at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, that the Civil War was fought over slavery. The Resolution stated that the war was fought…

This article from the Jackson Daily news attacked comments from a New York editor who had dismissed the state of Mississippi. The article condemned Northern intrusion into Southern affairs and dismisses criticism of the South as the words of a…

This article by the Washington Daily News criticized the actions of segregationists in Virginia, sayinf that massive resistance tactics were never "anything more than a delaying device, relatively certain to be thrown out, once it reached the…

Isham T. Wilkinson of Kenbridge, Virginia, wrote to Senator Harry Byrd protesting the integration of public schools, criticizing the NAACP, and avowing that the Supreme Court had violated States rights. He wrote the letter on stationary with the…
Output Formats

atom, dc-rdf, dcmes-xml, json, omeka-json, omeka-xml, rss2