Dear Congressman Abbitt

“Dear Congressman Abbitt”

Virginians and National Politics, 1948-1973

Browse Items (28 total)

Frequent correspondent, J.R. Orgain, Jr., wrote to Abbitt informing him that Reverend G.W. Walker of Winston-Salem, North Carolina, African American publisher of National Christian Magazine, was “willing to go any place called to neutralize the…

In a speech marked as to delivered in Farmville, Virginia, Abbitt denounced civil rights legislation advanced in Congress and supported by the Kennedy administration. Abbitt made the case that this legislation "perverted" the constitution and…

Handwritten addresses of several of Watkins' correspondents in the Virginia area.

Letter to Mr. Hawley Hawthorne, in which Abbitt expressed his support for massive resistance by stating that the people of Prince Edward County were "fighting to maintain constitutional government" and that they deserve the support of all Americans.…

The Attorney General of the state of Arkansas wrote to Abbitt imploring him to take action in Congress to strip the NAACP of its tax-exempt status. Abbitt replied that he was focused on this question and that he "realize[d] the dire predicament of…

This pamphlet and quasi-petition called for U. S. Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren's impeachment on the grounds of an alleged alliance with the Soviet Union, as evidenced by the desegregation ruling in 1954. The pamphlet expresses a belief…

In this pamphlet, the Citizens Grass Roots Crusade of South Carolina argued that civil rights efforts by Africans Americans were a communist plot to undermine the United states. The pamphlet contented that African Americans had been duped by the…

An issue of Common Sense, self-proclaimed as "The Nation's Anti-Communist Newspaper", with a focus on the relationship between communism and "race-mixing".

In this address to the Lions Club of Statesville, North Carolina, the Reverend James P. Dees began by describing his compassion for African Americans, but also declared his staunch opposition to integration. He also discussed his objections to…

This handwritten document attacks the 1954 Brown v Board of Education decision by the Supreme Court. The author argued that the Supreme Court had usurped God's law on the integrity of the races and incited young Americans to rioting and delinquency.
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