Dear Congressman Abbitt

“Dear Congressman Abbitt”

Virginians and National Politics, 1948-1973

Browse Items (343 total)

This copy of the anti-communist newspaper, Common Sense, no. 304, July 15, 1958, was sent to Abbitt by frequent correspondent Landon B. Lane. This newspaper publication was published by the Christian Educational Association, centered in Union, New…

This pamphlet, published by the Duval County Federation for Constitutional Government of Jacksonville, Florida, accused the NAACP, Americans for Democratic Action, World federalists, and other "leftist organizations” of carrying out “an organized…

A pamphlet encouraging white citizens of the state to begin funding segregated, white private schools for students. This pamphlet was released around the time counties such as Prince Edward closed public schools to resist integration. Taking the…

A postcard addressed to Abbitt by a self-described "grandson and son-in-law of of Confederate veterans." contained lyrics to a song entitled “God Stands with Us.” The song heralded "Dear Dixieland, land white and fair" and vowed the South would…

This postcard was sent to Abbitt from Wenatchee, Washington by Mrs. Hicks, who wrote, "this is our country don't let the unions wreck it" and called on Abbitt to pass legislation to limit the power of labor unions.

This handwritten document attacks the 1954 Brown v Board of Education decision by the Supreme Court. The author argued that the Supreme Court had usurped God's law on the integrity of the races and incited young Americans to rioting and delinquency.

A pamphlet written by William Stephenson listing ways that white Virginians could resist integration. The pamphlet urged readers to take action and to "beware of fence-sitters and despise the lukewarm."

An issue of Common Sense, self-proclaimed as "The Nation's Anti-Communist Newspaper", with a focus on the relationship between communism and "race-mixing".

In this address to the Lions Club of Statesville, North Carolina, the Reverend James P. Dees began by describing his compassion for African Americans, but also declared his staunch opposition to integration. He also discussed his objections to…

Letter to Abbitt from frequent correspondent, Ernest S. Jones of Petersburg, Virginia, regarding school integration, the validity of the Fourteenth Amendment, and communist influence in the NAACP. Abbitt thanked Jones for his insight and noted that…
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