Dear Congressman Abbitt

“Dear Congressman Abbitt”

Virginians and National Politics, 1948-1973

Browse Items (11 total)

Frequent correspondent Landon Lane sent Abbitt a pamphlet entitled "Fable of the Ducks and the Hens," writen by head of the American Nazi Party George Lincoln Rockwell evoking George Orwell's "Animal Farm," Rockwell critiqued Jewish power in the…

A letter to Abbitt from Irving Pritchett and his wife, of Petersburg, Virginia, denouncing the "Warren Court" as a "disgrace to the country" and Stokeley Carmichael and Martin Luther King as traitors attempting to "destroy everything our country…

B.L. McCullough of Seattle, Washington wrote to Abbitt to decry the Supreme COurt's ruling in Brown v. Board and Decried the Brown v. Board decision and other “Negroid decisions which no Southern State has the slightest intention of obeying." He…

In this letter sent by frequent correspondent Landon Lane, Lane reacted to decolonization in Africa and Congolese independence by connecting events abroad to domestic Civil Rights attitudes. Lane suggested that conservative whites "band together for…

A letter sent to President Lyndon B. Johnson, Senator Harry F. Byrd, and Abbitt following the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. which talks of rioting and the loss of law and order. The author wrote that "the Nation stands on the brink of…

A collection of correspondence sent to Abbitt from constituent Elizabeth Jordan addressing the Walter McCarran Immigration Act, foreign aid, welfare, and "The Song of Hate" in "South Pacific."

J.P. Lewis of Suffolk, Virginia, sent Abbitt both a letter and a follow-up telegram demanding that Congress investigate the NAACP and CORE as vigorously as it had the KKK. Lewis also shared his views that there was now "to [sic] much law for the…

Letter written to President Dwight D. Eisenhower from a frequent correspondent of Abbitt, Landon B. Lane. The letter draws connections between segregation and the preservation of a white race. Lane asked the president questions like, "would [you]…

Mrs. E.P. Westbrook, Jr. of Courtland, VA, a mother of three school age children wrote to Abbitt, Senator A. Willis Robertson, Senator Harry F. Byrd, and Governor Thomas B. Stanley to protest the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board. …

A satirical N.A.A.C.P. application without any indication of authorship or origin. The construction was likely circulated among segregationists in the wake of Brown v. Board.
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